Since many travelers love visiting cultural and historical sites, I started Roaming Historian with the hope that they would find value in hearing about those places from a credentialed historian. A year later, it seems that my blog and social media accounts resonate with people and I am very happy! I know that not everyone likes to read their information though, so in almost every city we visit I film “Roaming Historian” video clips (I dream of my own television show). The video clips are corny, but I have a blast doing them and my husband enjoys filming me. They are unscripted and I don’t know what I’m going to say (except for my standard intro) until I start talking. As a professor, my lectures are often the same way–it keeps it interesting for everyone. 🙂

My readers sometimes comment on the poor volume of the videos, which is due to the fact that these are usually shot with a cell phone. When filming this one, a woman stood near Jon and talked to her children the entire time I was talking. Jon made me do another take. I asked him not to delete the other. When I reviewed both at home, I realized that his fears were correct and that you can audibly hear a woman speaking in the background. Her children also run through the shot at the end. The other video was perfect. Too perfect. Rome isn’t perfect…and neither am I. Rome is gritty, chaotic, charming, and beautiful. It is loud and assertive. When I close my eyes and think of Rome, I hear a cacophony of sounds including laughter–mine and those of others. Rome is happiness for me.

The children who ran through the shot promptly found a mud-hole to play in. They covered themselves in dirt while their mother talked to friends whom she seemed to have unexpectedly encountered. I get the feeling this occurs a lot in Rome; I often hear people exclaiming their delight upon seeing someone. When she noticed her children covered in soil, she chided them, but then gave a melodic laugh. The kids giggled. She turned back to her friends and the children went back to their mud-hole. The 2000 year-old theater behind them (Teatro di Marcello) cast a shadow upon them. This is Rome…a place where you can play in the shadows of ancient buildings, a place that delights the heart, stomach, and soul…a perfect place. And this is the version of Rome that I want you to see, so here is my video clip from the Eternal City where I show you a great place to visit in Rome. I hope you enjoy the silly antics–bad volume and all.

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